English

English 1

This is a freshman English course that connects the 9th grade state standards of writing, grammar, reading, speaking and listening through a variety of lessons. Students read recommended literature works, write short narrative, persuasive, and informational essays along with a literary analysis. Students read the books Rising Out of Hatred by Eli Saslow and 1984 by George Orwell and view supplemental videos, articles, and lessons throughout the reading. We also do a public speaking speech unit to get students to step out of their comfort zone in a supportive and safe environment to become more confident and comfortable speaking in public.

 

Honors English 1

This is a freshman English course that connects the 9th grade state standards of writing, grammar, reading, speaking and listening through a variety of lessons. Students read recommended literature works, write short narrative, persuasive, and informational essays along with a literary analysis. Students read the books Rising Out of Hatred by Eli Saslow and 1984 by George Orwell and view supplemental videos, articles, and lessons throughout the reading. We also do a public speaking speech unit to get students to step out of their comfort zone in a supportive and safe environment to become more confident and comfortable speaking in public.

 

English 2

The study of English includes the study of literature, informational texts, language, communication, writing, and research. In this course the student will: study literature and informational texts; study grammar and learn its importance; learn to write appropriately, whether in a formal setting or informal setting; learn how to write a speech and deliver it with proper poise and confidence; and finally, learn how to research and gather data, so that he or she will be able to write a solid and intelligent research paper. This course is an extension of and will be building on the 9th grade English course. This course also provides PSAT prep that is built into the curriculum.   

 

Honors English 2

The study of English includes the study of literature, informational texts, language, communication, writing, and research. In this course the student will: study literature and informational texts; study grammar and learn its importance; learn to write appropriately, whether in a formal setting or informal setting; learn how to write a speech and deliver it with proper poise and confidence; and finally, learn how to research and gather data, so that he or she will be able to write a solid and intelligent research paper. This course is an extension of and will be building on the 9th grade English course. This course also provides SAT prep that is built into the curriculum. Due to the nature of being an honors course, the student will be asked to take a more responsible role in his or her education; for example, the student will develop his or her own thesis statements for essays without having a guided list of prompts from which to choose.

 

English 3

This course is a survey in American Literature, so the student will read selections from the birth of the United States to present day. It will continue to build on the foundation you built in the 9th and 10th grade English courses, so the student will continue to comprehend, evaluate and analyze texts, correctly and appropriately write in formal and informal situations, and be able to vigorously and responsibly research and gather solid evidence to back up any thesis statement. This course also provides SAT prep that is built into the curriculum.   

 

English 4

This is a senior English course that connects the 12th grade state standards of writing, grammar, reading, speaking, and listening through a variety of lessons. Students read advanced books by Yuval Noah Harari, write short narrative, persuasive, and informational essays along with rich and intelligent discussions in class about the world they will soon inherit.  

 

Creative Writing

Creative Writing: Students will write various pieces and respond to thought-provoking prompts. Students will get lots of practice brainstorming, writing, and editing their own creative writing. A good class for any students who enjoy writing or want to improve their craft through practice and feedback.

 

Journalism

In the first semester, students will learn about writing in a newspaper: interviews, event stories, columns, etc. Students will learn about access to quality information and journalism being an essential part of a functioning democracy. The second semester deals with media literacy, looking at social media, the flaws with corporate media, critical thinking, conspiracy theories, and consuming information in the modern world. 

 

Transitional English

Teacher approval necessary 

Students will read short passages and learn reading strategies such as guided reading, text features, making inferences, summarizing,  and central ideas and details.  This course will also review grammar skills, including writing paragraph responses.  Scholastic magazine and Commonlit will be used as resources.  (Class limit 15)

 

Writing Lab

Teacher approval necessary

Through the use of graphic organizers, students will learn the writing process step by step.  They will be required to construct multiple essays throughout the course, which will include researching information.  (Class limit 15) 

 

Honors Introduction to Film Studies

Open to grades 10, 11, and 12

This course will help students understand the production of film and introduce them to it in a way that will teach them how to study and analyze it as they would any piece of literature. We will examine, study, and analyze mise-en-scène, editing, sound, the narrative structure in film, and the history of film from the birth of cinema to the present day. By the end of this course, the students will have an extremely strong foundation in the study of film and the understanding of filmmaking techniques and cinematic language. This course is a prerequisite for Honors Film Genre and Theory and Film Production 1 and 2.

 

Honors Film Genre and Theory

Prerequisite: Introduction to Film Studies

This course builds on Introduction to Film Studies and will push the students to dive even deeper into the study of film. Many aspects and knowledge taken from the prerequisite course (Honors Introduction to Film Studies) will be utilized to help the students analyze film in two different ways: genre and theory. In this course, the students are expected to decipher how genre affects the viewing of a film and in what way it fits into the study of film (genres studied: documentary, the western, drama, horror, science fiction, comedy, fantasy, film noir, and the cult classic) . Furthermore, the students will examine, comprehend, analyze, and evaluate several film theories (Marxist, feminist, reception, and autuer) and apply it to the study of film. By the end of the course, students should have an even stronger foundation of film studies, in which they can dissect films in a much greater capacity.

 

Note:  Film Production courses are included in the Arts Classes section.          

 

College English

College English classes can be taken through the University of Maine at Augusta, Fort Kent, Machias, Colby College, Kennebec Community College, and Thomas College.  

 

Foreign Language

French 1-4 and Spanish 1-4:

Each French or Spanish course is a year-long, one-credit course comprised of five Anchor Standards (AS): 

  • Interpretive Listening

  • Interpretive Reading

  • Presentational Speaking

  • Presentational Writing

  • Interpersonal Communication

 

Within each Anchor Standard, students progress through Learning Targets (LT), or Steps, of gradually increasing language complexity. Students move on to more challenging material as they acquire more language. At all levels, students are developing strategies to derive meaning from level-appropriate spoken and written material, as well as to convey a level-appropriate comprehensible message in speech and writing.

Classes are conducted primarily in the target language using an approach called Teaching with Comprehensible Input (TCI). The language is presented in meaningful contexts in a way that students can understand, using limited amounts of new vocabulary and lots of repetition to encourage acquisition. English is used for clarification, as needed.

 

With students giving input and direction to the discourse, the topics covered relate to real life and students’ interests. Whenever possible, the arts are specifically connected to the instruction, often with cultural connections to the countries where the target language is spoken.

 

Mathematics

Pre-Algebra

This Pre-Algebra course is an introduction to basic algebra concepts and a review of arithmetic algorithms. The course emphasizes the concepts necessary to be successful in Algebra I and Geometry. The course helps students develop good mathematical study skills and learning strategies. Students will explore algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities involving integers, decimals, exponents, fractions, and polynomials. Students will encounter ratios, proportions, percents, linear functions, and graphing techniques and will think spatially regarding area and volume, analytic geometry, data analysis, and probability.

 

Algebra I

This is a first year algebra course in which students will learn to reason symbolically. Key content involves writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations, including systems of two linear equations in two unknowns. Emphasis is placed on factoring polynomial cubic, quadratic, and linear expressions. Quadratic equations are solved by factoring or by application of the quadratic formula. The course also includes the study of monomial and polynomial expressions, inequalities, exponents, functions, rational expressions, ratios, and proportions. Algebraic skills are applied in a wide variety of problem-solving situations.

 

Geometry

This course assumes that the student has demonstrated a solid foundation in algebra. Topics include the relationships between points, lines, and planes; the axiomatic system, logical thinking and proof writing; and measurement, including area and volume; congruency and similarity; two and three-dimensional geometric figures; parallel and perpendicular lines; and the coordinate plane. Reinforcement of algebraic problem solving methods are presented continually throughout this course within the context of geometric theorems, postulates, and concepts. Mathematical reasoning, analysis, and communication skills are applied in a wide variety of problem-solving situations.

 

Algebra II

This is a second-year algebra course in which students will extend learning from Algebra I and Geometry. This course introduces students to key concepts and theories which provide a foundation for further study in mathematics and increase students’ mathematical literacy, problem solving, and critical thinking skills. The key content involves the following: writing, solving, and graphing linear equations, inequalities and systems, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, equations, and expressions. Quadratic equations are solved by factoring, completing the square, graphically, or by application of the quadratic formula integrating both real and complex solutions. Mathematical reasoning, analysis, and communication skills are applied in a wide variety of problem-solving situations.

 

Business Math

This business math course will extend learning from previous mathematics classes. This course introduces students to real-world concepts and theories, which provide a foundation for success with mathematics in future personal and business endeavors as well as increase students’ mathematical literacy, problem solving, and critical thinking skills. The key content involves calculating personal income taxes, budgeting, and qualifying for a mortgage or other loans, interpreting credit card statements and terms, and creating a business plan, balancing a personal budget, etc. Mathematical reasoning, analysis, and communication skills are applied in a wide variety of problem-solving situations.

 

Honors Accelerated Math

This is an accelerated algebra course combined with accelerated geometric concepts. Students learn to reason symbolically and efficiently. Key content involves writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations, including systems of two linear equations in two unknowns. Quadratic equations are solved by factoring or by application of the quadratic formula. The course also includes the study of monomial and polynomial expressions, inequalities, exponents, functions, rational expressions, ratios, and proportions. The course also includes geometry-related topics, including the relationships between points, lines, and planes; the axiomatic system; logical thinking and proof-writing;  and measurement, including area and volume, congruency, similarity, two and three-dimensional geometric figures, parallel and perpendicular lines, and the coordinate plane. Algebraic skills are applied in a wide variety of geometric problem-solving situations.

 

Pre-Calculus

This course is designed to cover topics extending beyond Algebra II ranging from polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions to conic sections. Students will compose functions and graph complex numbers. Students will develop unit circle definitions of trigonometric functions, graph sine, cosine, and tangent functions; solve trigonometric identities and equations; and work with the Laws of Sines and Cosines. This is a rigorous math course for those on a college track. 

 

Honors Trigonometry

This course extends beyond the trigonometry covered in Pre-Calculus. Students will study relations, functions, graphs, trigonometry, polar coordinates, complex numbers, limits, and derivatives. Students will analyze and graph mathematical functions. There is an emphasis on verification of trigonometric identities using all of the basic trigonometric identities.

 

Real World Math

This math course will expose students to math as it pertains to the real world. The following units will be covered: telling time, money, food (recipes, store flyers, etc.), health, and shopping along with basic adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing. 

 

 
 
 
 
 
Science

Lab Biology

Biology is the study of life. It includes an introduction to the scientific method, cytology, genetics, botany, zoology, ecology, taxonomy, evolution, chemistry, and microbiology. Lab work includes biological and physical adaptation of human and animal anatomy and physiology (with attention to dance and movement). Students will use critical thinking in group discussions and present independent projects. Course work, lab work, and examinations will prepare students for future science courses. 

 

Honors Lab Biology

Biology is the study of life. We will examine the scientific method, cytology, genetics, botany, zoology, ecology, taxonomy, evolution, biochemistry, and microbiology. Students will use critical thinking in group discussions, prepare laboratory investigations, and present independent projects while exploring molecular biology, genetic variation, and biodiversity through evolution. Laboratory work may include complex biochemical reactions and involve working with living (and recently living) organisms. Course work, lab work, and examinations will prepare students for future science courses. This is an honors level course that requires rigour and dedication to studying. Students may work with college students at Colby College.

 

Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a laboratory-based course that investigates the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered will include the basic organization of the body and major body systems along with the impact of diseases on certain systems. The course is for those interested in science-related fields. The study will range from molecules, cells, body systems, and processes. This course is designed for college preparation, especially for biology and health career majors. 

 

Lab Chemistry

Chemistry is the study of matter from its tiniest origins to the structure of our bodies and on to even the great bodies in the heavens. We will examine the structure of matter from the atomic level with its chemical bonding to the conservation of matter through balanced stoichiometry, then to the states of matter, and finally move into the biochemistry of hydrocarbons and macromolecules. As we travel through the creation of modern chemistry, we will ground ourselves in the historical story of the scientific method, comparing and contrasting it with alchemy (and the use of chemistry in the arts and theater) and then questioning if we truly understand the fundamental building blocks of matter even as we manipulate them so easily. Students will engage in critical analysis and class discussions of our use of chemicals in daily life as well as completing independent projects. Course work, lab work, and examinations will prepare students for future science courses.

Honors Lab Chemistry

Chemistry is the study of matter from its tiniest origins to the structure of our bodies and on to even the great bodies in the heavens. In this course we will examine matter from atomic structure with its chemical bonding, to the conservation of matter through balanced stoichiometry, then to the states of matter, and finally move into the biochemistry of hydrocarbons and macromolecules extending into biochemistry. Laboratory work will include multiple home and class experiments, including Brownian Motion and the Maillard Reaction. Students will engage in critical analysis and class discussions of chemical compounds in daily life as well as completing independent projects. Course work, lab work, and examinations will prepare students for future science courses. Students should be comfortable with fractional measuring, evaluating molar weights, and the independent use of heating sources (including ovens). 

 

Physical Science

Physical Science is the study of all inorganic in the universe, bringing students through the fundamentals of Physics, Chemistry, Astronomy, and Earth Science. We will apply the scientific method to examine the creation of chemical elements and the universal application of physical laws. As we explore force, motion, and energy, we will learn the mathematical relationships between them. The properties of matter, atomic structure, and chemical reactions at a microscopic level will help us explain our macroscopic world. Electricity, magnetism, and waves will be featured in lab work as we explore the physical relationships between sound, light, and the chemical properties of creation (including musical instruments). The class also incorporates topics concerning the physical processes on earth and then applies those same processes to the forces and objects in space. Students will use critical thinking in group discussions and present independent projects.

 

Honors Physics And Physical Science

In this course, the students will examine the fundamentals of Physics within the context of exploring Chemistry, Astronomy, and Earth Science. Daily class discussions will focus on critical thinking, problem solving, and supporting conclusions with sound evidence and scientific reasoning. We will use mathematical equations and current scientific reading to explore the ever-changing nature of reality at both a universal and a quantum level. Lab work will include the invention and manufacturing of experimental apparatus to prove or disprove hypotheses. The properties of matter, atomic structure, and chemical reactions at a microscopic level will be applied at a macroscopic level as we move from theory into practice (including the creation of magical theatrical effects). Electricity, magnetism, particles, and waves will be discussed as they affect the physical processes on earth and the motions, characteristics, and forces in space. This is an honors-level course that requires rigour and dedication to studying as well as an independent work ethic. 

 

Environmental Science

This course surveys key topic areas including the application of scientific process to animal-related relationships; environmental analysis; ecology; energy flow; ecological structures; earth systems; and atmospheric, land, and water science. Topics also include the management of natural resources and analysis of private and governmental decisions involving the environment. Students will examine and discuss both current scientific understanding and the application of that understanding to global and local environmental issues. Classroom discussion will focus on problem-solving skills, including reshaping debate into consensus and action. Students will use the scientific method to evaluate outcomes of independent projects and present those projects for the community (with attention on the arts’ abilities to reframe and clarify scientific issues). 

 

Social Studies

World History

The course will cover the scope of world history in a linear but overlapping format from prehistory to the present day. The class will examine various regions of the world and how their histories are interconnected. Students will begin by examining early human societies from the dawn of hunter-gatherer societies to the creation of cities; we will end the year by looking at more modern topics in world history. 

 

United States History 

This one year course will examine the history of the United States of America. The course will make connections to overall themes in history such as immigration, race relations, national values, religion, etc. We will take a critical look at the story of American history from the good, the bad, and the downright ugly. We will start with the British colonies in North America and then examine and study the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the modern era. Students will be expected to think critically about decisions and events in our history that have molded our country to the present day. We will also be making connections to civics via the study of our foundational documents and precedents set by some of our most successful presidents.

 

Geography

This course will examine our world by using the five themes of geography: location, place, human/environmental interaction, movement, and regions.  We will look at the way the earth was created and why physical features like mountains and rivers occur (and what those things mean for humans and other animals). This course will cover topics from history, religion, folklore, science, economics, and much more!

 

Honors United States History

This one year course will examine the history of the United States of America. The course will make connections to overall themes in history such as immigration, race relations, national values, religion, etc. We will take a critical look at the story of American history from the good, the bad, and the downright ugly. We will start with the British colonies in North America, the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the modern era. Students will be expected to think critically about decisions and events in our history that have molded our country to the present day. We will also be making connections to civics via the study of our foundational documents and precedents set by some of our most successful presidents.

 

Government/Civics/Economics

This course will examine what it means to be a citizen of the United States; we will understand how our government works and functions; we will also understand how us as individuals were vital to the success of a republic like the United States.

 

Current Events

This one year course will examine the issues facing our country and world. Current Events covers anything in the news cycle from pop culture news, political news, sports news, scientific advancements, and so much more. The goal is to educate students on where to find legitimate news information and create informed citizens. 

Disclaimer: Topics in this course may be subject to change depending on current/relevant world events.

 

World Events

This one year course will examine the issues facing our country and world. World Events is an extension of Current Events. It covers anything in the news cycle from pop culture news, political news, sports news, scientific advancements, and so much more but with a focus on international news stories. The goal is to educate students on where to find legitimate news information and create informed citizens. 

Disclaimer: Topics in this course may be subject to change depending on current/relevant world events.

 

Honors International Relations

Have you ever wondered why countries and leaders act a certain way? Have you ever thought about why some countries are friends and some are enemies? This class will answer these questions by introducing students to political science while learning what makes people (leaders and citizens) and countries behave a certain way.  We will cover topics from leadership, civics, religion, geography, war, genocide, law, current events, and more.  This is an honors class meant for seniors.

 

Russian History and Politics

This one year course will examine the history, politics, and culture of Russia through the times before the Scythians, through the USSR, and into modern Russia with Vladimir Putin. The course will make connections to world history, European history, US history, and current events when relevant. We will be looking at a foreign country’s history, like Russia, and the student will be able to draw connections to other periods that are familiar or people that are familiar will help students understand that country and themselves better.

 

Latin American History

This one year course examines the geography, history, and current events of Central and South America. Topics of history included are ancient civilizations, age of exploration, the role of revolutions, and modern history. 

 

Honors World Wars

This course is a one-year, in-depth examination into the time period ranging from 1918-1945: World War 1 and World War 2. The fall semester will focus on the global conditions leading into World War, the war itself, and the contemporary implications of this war. The spring semester will focus on World War 2. We will study both conflicts through the lens of history but also be making connections and studying history through literature, music, art, theatre, and even science. This course is offered to juniors and seniors. 

 

Miscellaneous

Health

This course will provide students the tools to practice life-long health and wellness skills. Over the course of the semester, we will learn about body systems, nutrition, and physical activity; learn the difference between chronic and infectious diseases; and learn how to base current and future decisions on the topics of drugs, healthy relationships, alcohol use, and safe technology practices on facts. We will spend the semester focusing on mental illnesses, anxiety and stress, and will learn effective coping strategies. This class will incorporate and encourage many different forms of learning from the reading of scientific texts and novel excerpts, writing, film, open discussions, projects, art, music, yoga, and mindfulness. Students will learn that healthy behaviors and choices are in their hands and will be provided with an arsenal of tools to help make the best choices.

 

Chess

Chess is the classic game that develops spatial thinking and strategies and builds focused concentration. The class is geared for all levels of chess players. Intermediate and advanced players learn sophisticated combinations and strategies and advanced opening moves. Four leadership roles are voted on by classmates. The final tournament is a live chess event.

 

Sewing 

This one-semester course will allow students to explore fashion design. Students will redesign an outfit to be used at the end of the semester fashion show. A research paper on fashion will be required from all students.  Course fees apply. 

 

Gaming

This course is offered to 11th and 12th grade students who are interested in E-Sports and want to play multiplayer games agreed upon by other members in the class and the instructor. The class fosters team building, practice, and skill that might lead to a competitive gaming team. 

 
 

© 2021 by MAINE ARTS ACADEMY

Maine Arts Academy

11 Goldenrod Lane,

Sidney ME 04330

(207) 618- 8908

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